Antique Voile Filet Lace Bedcoverlet
Antique Voile Filet Lace Bedcoverlet
Antique Voile Filet Lace Bedcoverlet
Antique Voile Filet Lace Bedcoverlet

Antique Voile Filet Lace Bedcoverlet
Free Gift

Regular price $4,895.00

This 100" wide x 72" long exquisite antique Royal Bedcoveris is layered in the photo with the Antique Ruffled Window Panel or Bedcoverlet. This is a one-of-a-king handmade antique so only one piece is available.

Voile Filet Lace Bedcoverlet

Use it for a king- or queen-sized bed and let the voile, filet lace and ruffled round medallion in the middle of coverlet work its elegant magic on your bedroom. It was made in Hungary circa 1890's in the Hungarian Art Nouveau Style, called szecessio. This piece is hand-wash and line-dry only: do not put it in the dryer! This antique is not in perfect condition so a few repaired areas exist. The bed image was photographed by Stephanie Welbourne for Victoria Magazine.

See Our Antique Textiles in Person

This is but one of many luxurious one-of-a-kind antiques we have in our Pensacola atelier, as we have row upon row of textiles that include everything from antique French heirloom linens and primitive Austro-Hungarian Empire textiles to Art Deco and Bohemian specimens—at last count two million one-of-a-kind linens of the finest quality.

If you see a beautiful specimen on this site that you would like to see in person and you cannot visit us but you are a regular at either Round Top or the High Point Market, we will happily bring it to one of these shows so you can see for yourself how remarkable it is. See our Calendar of Events page for fair dates and let us know if we can bring our sumptuousness to you.

A Word About Filet Lace

The writings of scholars are important to being able to trace the history of textiles, as these fragile elements often have not survived due to the fact they were not treated delicately. While one academician references Exeter Cathedral as possessing four pieces of Filet lace as far back as 1327, another one notes there was a "cushion of net-work in St. Paul's Cathedral as early as 1295." You can see why specimens of this style of embroidery that are in good condition would be so valuable by the complexity of the knotting and the mesh of this beautiful textile we are presenting here.